Queer Movie Night

(Graphic by Elija Janka)

7:00-8:30 p.m. on the 4th Monday of each Month

Zoom link for Queer Movie Night: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85916588712

QUEER MOVIE NIGHT works like a book club; participants view the same movie independently, and meet via Zoom on the 4th Monday of each month for a group discussion of that month’s film. If you don’t have access to the movie or the service where he movie is streaming, have a question, or would like to be added to our QMN mailing list ( only Queer Movie Night related information is sent to this mailing list), contact us and we can help! Contact Queer Movie Night

Monday, January 25: Weekend (2011)

Description by Matt Lawrence: Working on a shoestring budget with only essential tools, the writer/director/editor Andrew Haigh proves how much a gifted filmmaker can do with how little in this groundbreaking same-sex romance. Weekend is available to rent for $4.00 on Amazon Prime; contact us for access to free viewing.. Read an extended interview by Matt Lawrence here.

Upcoming movies:

Monday, February 22: The Aggressives (2005)

Description by Naomi Baltuck: The Aggressives is an insightful 2005 documentary following the lives of six subjects, masculine presenting POC and their “femme” counterparts. Through their experiences, the documentary explores gender, sexuality, and race.  Filmed over five years in NYC, the featured subjects share their dreams, secrets and deepest fears. Available free on Amazon Prime and Kanopy, available through Sno-Isle and other libraries.

Monday, March 22: Margarita with a Straw (2014)

Description by Manny Lopez: Centers on a young woman from India with cerebral palsy exploring her bisexuality. It is one ofthe few films that explore the experience of a queer character who is disabled. Potential trigger warnings: The main character has a contentious relationship with her mother,who is her primary caretaker. Available for streaming on Netflix and free on Amazon Prime.

wEEKEND (2011) description by Matt Lawrence

Russell notices Glen at the pub right away, and feels lucky later, when he leaves with Glen in tow.  But the next morning, it quickly becomes clear that they have conflicting ways of being out.  Glen provokes homophobic reactions in public so he can counter them, while Russell downplays his sexuality (even with his friends) so as not to alienate anyone.  Rather than driving them apart, this difference intrigues them.  As they open up to each other, their growing intimacy becomes more important – and more complex – than their ideology.            

Working on a shoestring budget with only essential tools, the writer/director/editor Andrew Haigh proves how much a gifted filmmaker can do with how little.  He uses simple, direct film grammar like a poet.  Shooting entirely on existing locations with mostly natural light, his documentary-like approach and talented actors continually create moments that feel wholly authentic and “found.”  This frank naturalism extends to the sex as well (a daring gamble for a same-sex romance in 2011, and no less so today).  Thanks to this film, several straight adults I know realized that gay men could have intercourse face-to-face.  That anyone is confused about this shows just how rare and restricted representations of gay lovemaking have been in our culture. 

Great films don’t always get the reception they deserve, but fortunately this wasn’t the case with Weekend.  It won 45 honors from a host of festivals and critics associations, and in the first major survey of LGBT films conducted by the British Film Institute in 2016, was named the 2nd Best LBGT Film of all time.

(Available to rent for $4 on Amazon Prime; contact us for access to free viewing)

Contact Queer Movie Night

Page Updated 29 December 2020

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